Pallister will cancel NDP vote tax

A new Progressive Conservative government will cancel the vote tax subsidy for political parties saving taxpayers $2.4 million over the next four years.

“Tax dollars should go to front line services for families not political payouts to parties”, said PC Leader Brian Pallister. “We will eliminate the NDP Vote Tax in our first year in office.”

The Progressive Conservatives are the only party who has never accepted the NDP vote tax. Today, it refused to accept about $170,000 the party is eligible for from 2015.

From 2012 to 2015 the NDP were eligible to receive $1.1 million and the Liberals $253,000. More than three quarters of the vote tax subsidy paid out since 2012 has gone to the Selinger NDP.

Earlier this year, PC House Leader Kelvin Goertzen cautioned the other parties that in the first sitting of the legislature after the election a new PC government will introduce legislation to repeal the vote tax. The legislation would be made effective for any payments applied for or received in 2016.

“Any vote tax money received or applied for in 2016 will need to be refunded to taxpayers,” Goertzen said. “Unlike the Selinger NDP, we believe parties should be based on voluntary donations not vote tax subsidies.”

Investment in people, not politics is part of our better plan for a better Manitoba.

 

BACKGROUNDER

·         Parties can decline the payment of the vote tax through a written submission from the party Financial Officer with the Annual Financial Statement to be filed by March 31 of each year. Such a submission has been included in our Annual Financial Statement.

·         The PC Party is eligible to receive $242,712 per year in vote tax funding, but has consistently refused to accept the subsidy. The PC Team is the only party since 2012 to refuse to accept the vote tax and including the 2015 allocation has returned $970,848 to Manitoba taxpayers.

·         The NDP is eligible to receive $278,811 per year; the Liberal Party $63,255 per year; the Green Party $14,449 per year.

·         In the first sitting of the legislature a new PC government will introduce legislation to repeal the per-vote subsidy known as the vote tax. The legislation would be made effective for any payments applied for or received in 2016.